Stop Racial Profiling

Racism in Louisiana is still a problem.

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Although historians argue that there are no hard facts linking slavery to racism, empirical data indicate that racist sentiments are strongest in the belt that runs through Louisiana and Arkansas. It is clear that slave trade was successfully abolished more than 150 years ago. However, it draws curiosity as to why racism is still rampant in the south. For instance, Racism in Louisiana is still a problem.

Remnants of the infamous Ku Klux Klan society still exist in the south. The only thing different is that most of these groups use names that are more accommodative and acceptable in the current society. Take for instance the group that calls itself EURO (European-American Unity Rights Organization). Supposedly, EURO works under the mandate of protecting the rights and heritage of whites in America. However, what raises eyebrows is the fact that it operates under extremist ideologies and was founded by a former Ku Klux Klan leader.

Perhaps from an economical and social viewpoint, it can be possible to discover the tangent of interaction between historical slavery and modern day racism in a state such as Louisiana. Land owners in south primarily depended on slave trade to make commercial farming profitable. For one, slaves were cheap to acquire and maintain. In addition, slaves virtually had no rights as they were not classified in the same social status as whites. This meant that whites could use the slaves however they wanted as long as profits kept trickling. Abolition of slave trade eliminated slave-master relationships, but the social pillars were left intact. These social structures formed a perfect breeding environment for racism.

Racism has very strong economic undertones and that is why it's easy to connect it to slavery. For instance, in 2002 activist groups in Louisiana met to criticize the department of Housing and Urban Development for supposedly wasting money on people from a certain race. This clearly brings into perspective the economical perspective of racism. On one hand we have minority groups claiming to be left out economically, and on the other hand whites who feel that activities meant to empower minority groups are a waste of resources.

Racism operates in one of the most dangerous forms in present day America. Every group wants to play the victim and as such, it is very difficult to reconcile these groups. Furthermore, most whites will either claim that racism doesn't exist completely or claim that it is used by blacks and other minority groups to gain economic leverage



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